Completing work: the submission process.

13 thoughts on “Completing work: the submission process.”

  1. Andrea, when you are published (and you will be published) I will be so proud to have known you when you were involved in your “other” ventures.

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  2. I keep my stack of rejections in a folder titled, “They’ll be sorry one day.” Good luck! I look forward to hearing about your successes too.

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  3. We’re so engaged in doing things to achieve purposes of outer value that we forget the inner value, the rapture that is associated with being alive, is what it is all about.

    Joseph Campbell

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  4. I’m still stuck in the “what the hell do I do with all these words” part. How do you begin organizing everything and figuring out how (and what) to submit?

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    1. Well, my 100th post (where I picked a favorite word from my first 100 blog entries) really helped me a lot because it required that I read every word I’ve written here on my blog. As I read each post, I took note of which entries seemed to activate readers, and also which pieces I am really proud of and am still passionate about. I made a long list of favorites, then reread those more closely to figure out which ones could be tweaked to read more like an article and less like a blog post. This became my shortlist of “to submit” pieces.

      Once I had my shortlist, I started doing online research of the types of publications they might fit, bought the Writer’s Market book, picked my writer friend’s brain about her knowledge of suitable markets. I follow several journals on Twitter and Facebook – journals that I enjoy reading myself – so I’ve kind of been keeping an eye on the types of writing they typically publish. I read their submission guidelines carefully because some, like Creative Nonfiction, will not accept previously published work (publishing on a blog counts as being published). Then I tried to pair pieces with publications and started submitting.

      I’m not sure any of my stuff is a great fit for any of the journals I’ve submitted to, but wanted to get it “off my desk.” I haven’t been able to move forward on new stuff lately because I feel like I’m wading through these piles of words that I want to send out. The Writer’s Market book was really helpful for some of the really basic stuff, like making sure you read the masthead and address your cover letter to a specific editor. For you, I’d check into film magazines, if you don’t already have a favorite that you read.

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      1. Andrea–
        Thank you very much for the insight into your process. I guess a lot of it is simple courage! Best of luck to you– I’ve no doubt you will be published, and often. Thank you again.
        BR

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  5. Every rejection is one step closer to an acceptance. I’ve become numb to the rejections and simply insert the date into my spreadsheet as well. However, just yesterday, I received notice that a short essay will be published in an anthology coming out this fall. So I remind myself that I’m further along than I was 12 months ago. Keep it up and don’t forget to give yourself grace.

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