The right to be forgotten (part 1 of 2)

9 thoughts on “The right to be forgotten (part 1 of 2)”

  1. Very interesting 🙂 When it comes to the internet I always ask my kids if I can post pictures of them.. Most of the time they don’t mind..but there has been occasion where my daughter has said no… and I had to respect her wishes.. I’m interested in that book now! It sounds like it has something even adults can walk away with

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    1. Yes, the interview itself is an eye-opener for anyone, young or old, who uses social media. It’s not just teens who self-reveal before they self-reflect, or who spend hours curating their online personality. I took a tremendous amount away from it and still think about it more than a year later.

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  2. Hmmm . . . I wonder if we could have a conversation that didn’t include our husbands or kids. What would we talk about? We could try it as an experiment one day. But it would have to be time limited – 10 minutes or so. If I don’t get my mommy/wifey stuff off of my chest to you, I’ll surely explode!

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  3. It’s a bit of a conundrum. As bloggers we’re advised to make it personal, as novelists to write what we know…but as private individuals we demand the right to live unregarded lives. Haven’t solved this yet, either. Thanks for a great post!

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    1. It’s tricky business, that’s for sure. Have you read ‘The Woman Upstairs’ by Claire Messud? I can’t stop thinking about that book as I address this question as a writer, of the cruelty and betrayal that sometimes happen in the name of art. I don’t want to be that writer, the one who will take advantage of anyone for a good story.

      So then to find the stories…

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