Learning to let go in the kitchen

13 thoughts on “Learning to let go in the kitchen”

    1. Loved this beautiful post. I can report the same rushed-ness and stinginess in the kitchen. My tween son still asks to spend the afternoon baking with me. He (and I) fondly remembers our baking and cooking days from when he was younger. Increasingly, I’m slowing down to take him up on his requests. Not always, mind you, but when I do, I’m sure glad I did (and so is he!).

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      1. Yes, the slowing down can be hard if you haven’t planned ahead, or if you’re just crunched for time. That’s the biggest lesson I’m learning here. When our kids were in preschool, the instructors told us “As soon as they start asking to help, that’s when to teach them, even though every task will take three times as long as if you did it yourself.” I didn’t take that advice, and now I wish I had – they’d know a lot more basics, and it wouldn’t take as much time to teach them now. It’s never too late, though, and I guess 7 is better than 37 😉

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  1. Fantastic! I can’t wait to cook with our son, but I’ve already learned from my cooking with my husband that letting go of control, knowing to start him on a task earlier than how long I’d need, etc., will certainly teach me, too! I hope you let Owen in on the cooking action, too…wish my MIL had done more to teach my husband how to cook when he was young (though maybe she did and he just forgot?). Or he wasn’t interested at the time? Ah well…he’s slowly learning now!

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    1. Owen is interested in practical things, like how to make his own oatmeal so he doesn’t have to depend on me. I asked this weekend if there was anything he was interested in learning how to cook, but he never answered. I think I will add basic cooking lessons to my housekeeping summer school 😉 Any ideas where to begin? What basic skills would have helped your husband?

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