In defense of the ordinary

82 thoughts on “In defense of the ordinary”

  1. Inspiring post. Reminder that I started my blog to write for myself, to capture my thoughts and feelings in life’s moments and encounters. I’ve veered away from that, wondering as some have mentioned here whether that was interesting enough for anyone to want to read … and like !! I need to backtrack, write for myself about my ordinary and extraordinary moments. Thank you for a great post and reminder.

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  2. Wow! I needed this! I’ve always believed in the beauty of the mundane, but often struggle to write about it. As I’ve been trying to grow my own blog I try to write about ‘ordinary’ things profoundly, and often find that I’m trying too hard. Sometimes it’s alright to just write about cooking an eggplant. . . I’ll be keeping this post fresh in my mind. Thanks!

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  3. This post is too accurate. It’s all in the point of view. There are two persons watching a person cleaning a car, one of them sees him and thinks of how brain connects the workings of hands and legs. This is a doctor. While the other one sees a man and the expression he is holding, which way he sweeps his scrub and thinks why is he doing that. These fine gestures are remembered by him. That is a writer.

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  4. Oh my, can I relate to this post. But first, let me say, you’re an amazing writer and as I was reading this post, I rolled my eyes and thought, “It’s always the great ones who think they don’t have what it takes.” I can perfectly envision your writing filling the pages of a book or renowned magazine. I guess it’s like you said, so many successful writers have been inspired by seemingly ordinary things. But I’m beginning to learn that nothing is nothing. Everything means something. Whatever resonates in your soul has worth, even if it’s a fellow soccer mom or an eggplant. If the mundanity of life inspires you, then it has the potential to inspire others, which means it’s totally worth writing:)

    Thanks for putting my thoughts into words in this entry:)

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  5. Poetry is beautiful. I had attempted to explore that field once, but in vain, gave up when I realized I was no poet. I realize that you don’t have to rhyme your verses to become a poet, but reading beautiful verses by Robert Frost and John Keats that make you tremble to your bones when you understand the lines, it is clear that you need a powerful source of driving power to write about such moving emotions.
    In my blog, I am trying to express something that is difficult for me. I am writing about my dreams. People are scared to express their deepest secrets and desires. In many ways, dreams are the hidden secrets of the unconscious that we ourselves haven’t been able to understand or learn about our self. Dreams can be as crazy as possible. They are beyond limits of imagination. Hence they can be confusing and random.
    This post has motivated me to be less worried and open up more. Thank you for that.

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  6. Beautifully written, thank you. I am living in a new home and am befuddled the mysterious night noise. I look forward to reading your posts. Inspiring.

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  7. Being true to our style even it may not seem perfect in othes’ eyes is still fulfilling… we live in the moment, be present and just let go… but when others come into picture, that’s when the chaos start…

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  8. I love the way you described the reasons you read and write at the end there. It really resonated with me as I realized that’s what I do to, but have never put words to it quite like you did. I am just dabbling in the idea of being a writer and I found this post very inspirational, so for that I thank you!

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